Content: Week 1

by rseiderman

First week of content almost complete! So far, three of my articles have been posted on TBINAA’s Tumblr and cross-posted to Facebook and Twitter. (It looks like I’ll have one more article posted tomorrow and that’ll be that.) Here’s a breakdown of engagement by post:

Posted 5/27
“Valuing the Body as Subject: Empowering Embodiment”
Tumblr notes: 33
Facebook likes: 28
Facebook comments: 5
Facebook shares: 12

Update 7/10
Tumblr notes: 35
Facebook likes: 28
Facebook comments: 5
Facebook shares: 12

Posted 5/29
“XOJane’s Fabulous ‘How Not To Be A Dick’ Series: Seeing Others as Subject”
Tumblr notes: 8
Facebook likes: 8
Facebook comments: 3
Facebook shares: 1

Update 7/10
Tumblr notes: 15
Facebook likes: 8
Facebook comments: 3
Facebook shares: 1

Posted 5/31
“The Body Positivity Paradox: Shaming the Thin Body”
Tumblr notes: 50
Facebook likes: 127
Facebook comments: 20
Facebook shares: 48

Update 7/10
Tumblr notes: 63
Facebook likes: 131
Facebook comments: 20
Facebook shares: 50

(The first post, “Valuing the Body as Subject,” was intended to be my big contribution this week, but obviously “The Body Positivity Paradox” trumped it as far as reach goes.)

This week has taught me a lot that I wasn’t exactly expecting. First, the internship looks different on the ground than it does on paper. Though I sent my boss a total of 5 blog posts’ worth of content, 2 photos to be used on Facebook, 1 link to a video, and 1 link to a project TBINAA followers would be interested in, only 3 of the blog posts have actually been used. (The rest, to be fair, will probably show up sometime in the future.) It’s not necessarily that I have a problem with my material being edited or omitted, I just hadn’t fully realized that that would happen.

Second, the spacing of those three posts has been different than I’d thought it would be. My boss received four days of content by Tuesday, but the articles were posted Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Which, again, is fine—my boss is incredibly busy, she was traveling this week, etc. But I realized that, since she controls what’s posted, I’m dependent on her to disseminate my work. It’s humbling to have my exposure in someone else’s hands.

Third, the varying engagement with my content surprised me. My first post was based in no small part on ideas born out of my final project in 841, so it was more academic than the others; I wasn’t expecting an explosion of love about it, but it was really really heartening to see comments like, “This is written/worded so perfectly” and “Brilliant writing and so true.”

My second post was basically a redirect to a great series that illustrates the embodiments of lots of different kinds of people. As is clear from the stats above, there wasn’t too much engagement with that post; one comment on it asked, perhaps a bit pointedly, why “an organisation who maintains they support self love and body empowerment [is] encouraging the use of the word ‘dick’ as a negative and stigmatised term?” and went on to say that doing so “[s]eems like a double standard…” I was kind of floored by this response because, well, that thought hadn’t crossed my mind but also because a woman wrote the comment. Who knows.

So then, after the rather lackluster reception of the second post, the third post’s relative popularity was pretty awesome. Commenters said things like, “I have waited for an article like this for so long…Thank you, My Body is not an Apology, for sharing this. It means so much to me on my own journey to self love” and “thank the fucking lord for this article! people need to read this and TAKE IT IN!” Which was great for me to see.

My boss will hopefully post the last article, “What’s Beauty Got To Do With It?”, tomorrow. In it, I talk about how “beauty” as the go-to for body empowerment language doesn’t go far enough because it still objectifies. (When beauty is in the eye of the beholder, there always has to be a beholder.) Let’s see how that goes over!

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